Summer Reading

June 25, 2010

Do you remember the scene in “Grease” where John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John’s characters broke out into song about what they did during their summer vacation? I think it went a little something like this…

OK, so that didn’t really happen in the movie.

Wouldn’t it be cool though if people sang the praises of summer reading? Fortunately, there have been recent studies doing just that- albeit without the musical numbers. The reports indicate that kids who read over the summer have better retention on what they’ve just learned and an advantage for the following school year.

I know reading is the last thing on young people’s minds during this time of year. But there are more and more incentives out there for them to pick up a book.

Libraries nationwide are inviting kids and teens to “make a splash” and participate in the many summer reading programs they are offering. In turn, there are prizes to be won based on how many books or pages they read.

Some bookstores are giving out free books after kids read a certain amount on their own. Barnes & Noble has partnered with Scholastic and multi-media series “The 39 Clues” to launch their program. Borders, with “The Diary of a Wimpy Kid” author Jeff Kinney, has put out a “double-dog dare” challenge for kids to read 10 books this summer.

Grown-ups shouldn’t feel too left out. Some libraries have summer reading programs aimed specifically for adults. At McKenzie Books, we are extending our Facebook and Twitter Book Giveaways to you- our Green Frugal readers. Comment on any post for your chance to win a $5 gift certificate to use on our site. There’ll be one lucky winner per week all summer long!

Showing by example is a great way to get kids to read. So what are you waiting for? What’s on your summer reading list?

2 thoughts on “Summer Reading

  1. Jim Smith Post author

    In the book Outliers (http://mkzbooks.com?isbn=9780316017923), Gladwell talks about ways that kids can “get ahead” of other kids in school and to maximize their potential. Challenging your kids to read over the summer is a great way! Many examples are given in the book about how kids can be challenged outside of school hours, and how that leads to greatness later in life.

  2. MJ

    I only have 2 more weeks of summer vacation. I’ve averaged 4 books a week! Still on my list are The Help and Karen White’s Charleston books – The House on Tradd Street and The Girl on Legare Street!

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